Upcoming Concerts

ERNST KAREL, KATARINA MILJKOVIC, MORGAN EVANS-WEILER, JOHN MALLIA
Beyond These Things: A Concert for Jed Speare on World Listening Day
NEC Pierce Hall
Monday, July 18, 2016

COLORGUARD at Café Fixe
Tuesday, June 9, 2016

ERNST KAREL/BHOB RAINEY
CAROLINE PARK
Boston City Hall
Friday, September 30, 2016

Beyond These Things
A Concert for Jed Speare
NEC Pierce Hall
Monday, July 18, 2016

Image: Quiet Zone by Jed Speare

Non-Event and NEC present
Beyond These Things: A Concert for Jed Speare
World Listening Day

ERNST KAREL
KATARINA MILJKOVIC
MORGAN EVANS-WEILER
JOHN MALLIA

NEC, Pierce Hall
241 St. Botolph Street
Boston, MA
7pm / FREE

Ernst Karel makes electroacoustic music and experimental nonfiction sound works for multichannel installation and performance. His recent projects are edited/composed using unprocessed location recordings; in performance he sometimes combines these with analog electronics to create pieces which move between the abstract and the documentary. Recent sound projections have been presented at Oboro, Montreal; EMPAC, Troy NY; Arsenal, Berlin; and the 2014 Whitney Biennial. Sound installations in collaboration with Helen Mirra have been exhibited at Culturgest, Lisbon; KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin; Audiorama, Stockholm; MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge; and in the 2012 Sao Paulo Bienal. Video with multichannel sound collaborations include Ah humanity! (2015, with Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Véréna Paravel) and Single Stream (2014, with Toby Lee and Pawel Wojtasik). Other projects include the long-running electroacoustic duo EKG, and the location recording/performance collective the New England Phonographers Union.

Composer Katarina Miljkovic investigates interaction between science, music and nature through collaborative musical performance. This interest led her to the mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot's essay The Fractal Geometry of Nature and self-similar complex structures resulting in the cycle, Forest, "a dreamy piece, along the lines of Feldman or Brown, entirely captivating" (Signal to Noise). Her generative music has been described as “a refined, hypnotic dream” (Danas), “a work of musical and visual slow-motion with only a few delicately elaborated musical metaphors" (Radio Belgrade), and "ambient tone poem that moved hypnotically through the sonic frame" (Lucid Culture).

Morgan Evans-Weiler is a Boston based sound artist, composer, performer, curator and educator whose work includes ensemble and solo compositions, improvisations, sound installations, drawings, concert curation, production and ensemble direction. Exploring the realms of contingency and environment, Evans-Weiler's works examine the process of change and the inherent creativity that exists as a precondition of our physical and temporal experience. He uses objects, psychoacoustic phenomena, stasis, stillness and our sense of place as compositional material to explore our environmental experience of space and time. His recent album Violin/Sine was called 'transfixing' by writer Steve Smith and included in the Boston Globe’s list of "Best Local Classical Albums of 2015."

John Mallia lives and works in Boston, where he is a member of the Composition Faculty, and directs the Electronic Music Studio, at the New England Conservatory of Music. His compositional process is informed by spatial constructs and concepts, and a fascination with presence, ritual, and the thresholds standing between states of existence or awareness. In addition to composing chamber music and works combining acoustic instruments with electronics, he creates fixed media compositions, and collaborates with visual artists on multimedia works, including installation.

This concert is part of Beyond These Things: A Series for Jed Speare

This program is supported in part by a grant from the Boston Cultural Council, a local agency which is funded by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, administrated by the Mayor’s Office of Arts + Culture.

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COLORGUARD at Café Fixe
Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Non-Event Presents
Our August Experimental Coffee House
featuring

COLORGUARD

Café Fixe
1642 Beacon Street (Washington Square)
Brookline, MA 02445
617-879-2500
7 p.m./$5 (*Note earlier start time!)

COLORGUARD is the long running project of Kryssi Battalene. In her formative days Battalene employed an arsenal of rickety tape machines, fan-motor-modified turntables, slabs of shellac, and various home-made electronics. Since the mid 2000s Colorguard has released on such esteemed imprints as Fag Tapes, Alien Passengers, Gilgongo Records, and Male Bonding.

Battalene also finds herself playing in a variety rock projects. Whether it's her lead guitar duties in New Haven stalwarts Mountain Movers, strumming through the outsider punkness of Medication, leading her psych/noise project Headroom, or taking on any number of side projects, Battalene's entrancing leads always shine through. Now finding cohesion somewhere between her noise roots and psychedelic guitar meditations Battalene has brought Colorguard to all new territory.

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ERNST KAREL/BHOB RAINEY
CAROLINE PARK
Boston City Hall
Friday, September 30, 2016

City Hall mezzanine (photo: Bill Lebovich)

Non-Event, the Mayor's Office of Arts and Culture, and HUBweek present
Concrete Sounds: Multichannel works in Boston City Hall

ERNST KAREL + BHOB RAINEY
CAROLINE PARK (solo)

Boston City Hall
Mezzanine Level (enter through City Hall Plaza)
One City Hall Plaza
Boston, MA
Doors: 6:30 pm | Event begins: 7:00 pm
FREE (RSVP requested)

Eventbrite - Concrete Sounds: Ernst Karel/Bhob Rainey + Caroline Park at City Hall

About the artists

ERNST KAREL makes electroacoustic music and experimental nonfiction sound works for multichannel installation and performance. His recent projects are edited/composed using unprocessed location recordings; in performance he sometimes combines these with analog electronics to create pieces which move between the abstract and the documentary. Recent nonfiction films on which he has done sound work include The Iron Ministry, Manakamana, and Leviathan, all produced in the Sensory Ethnography Lab at Harvard University, where as a Lecturer on Anthropology, he teaches a class in sonic ethnography.

BHOB RAINEY is an award-winning composer / performer, saxophonist, and sound designer. He holds a Masters in Music Composition from New England Conservatory, where he studied with iconoclastic microtonalist Joe Maneri, jazz legends Paul Bley and Ran Blake, and the mathematically gifted composer Pozzi Escot.

In 1998, with trumpeter Greg Kelley, Rainey founded the duo Nmperign, which was highly influential in an emerging phase of non-idiomatic improvisation often referred to as "lowercase" or "EAI" (Electroacoustic Improvisation). In 2000 he founded The BSC, an improvising large ensemble, in which he developed techniques for an improvisational discipline that were eventually outlined in his 2011 publication, Manual. By the mid-2000's, Rainey began to produce electronic and algorithmic works. He spent five years collaborating with German composer Ralf Wehowsky (RLW) on the 2007 release, I don't think I can see you tonight, which, along with Nmperign and Jason Lescalleet's Love Me Two Times (2006), established him as a formidable electronic composer who synthesizes streams of musique concrete, computer music, and improvisation.

CAROLINE PARK is a composer, musician, and artist working within the medium of experimental electronic music. Her 2015 digital release "less than human" was called "transportive ... a hissing, humid approximation of summer and wet earth to surround" (The Wire) and "luminous and droning ... best experienced in full body" (Disquiet).

As a composer-performer, Caroline collaborates frequently with Asha Tamirisa in duo situations, performs as 1/4 of the electro-improv quartet BUMPR (Peter Bussigel, Stephan Moore, Tim Rovinelli), and performs as 1/3 of a trio with Beth McDonald and Matt Samolis. A Los Angeles native, Caroline received B.M. and M.M. degrees in composition at the New England Conservatory and is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Multimedia and Electronic Music Experiments at Brown University (MEME@Brown). Her CD "OCTAVLUV" was called "glowing" and "beautiful" (The Sound Projector), and her digital release "field" was described as music existing "in an abstract zone, where space bends and algorithms are allowed bountiful time to work their fractal, generative beauty" (Disquiet). She lives and works in Providence, RI.

This program is supported in part by a grant from the Boston Cultural Council, a local agency which is funded by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, administrated by the Mayor’s Office of Arts + Culture.

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